Strava launches posts to bring athletes back for everything else beyond their workouts


When you walk upstairs at the Strava offices over on Third Street in San Francisco, you’ll find boards as tall as your typical human. They’re covered with images — screenshots of Instagram posts, comments and a whole lot of paper cutouts of other social networks printed onto little sheets — and they served as the launchpad for Strava’s latest product as it tries to continue to be the home for athletes and their activities.

It was a design exercise to discover how athletes were talking about their lives and adventures on platforms that were explicitly not Strava. After all, Strava was a place for activities, and not where you’d talk about the latest biking helmet. Now the design team and Strava hopes it has absorbed and learned everything it can from that kind of…

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Facebook acquires anonymous teen compliment app tbh, will let it run


Facebook wants tbh to be its next Instagram. Today, Facebook announced it’s acquiring positivity-focused polling startup tbh and will allow it to operate somewhat independently as it’s done with Instagram and WhatsApp.

tbh had scored 5 million downloads and 4 million daily active users in the past 9 weeks with its app that lets people anonymously answer kind-hearted multiple-choice questions about friends who then receive the poll results as compliments. You see questions like “Best to bring to a party?”, “Their perseverance is admirable?”, and “Could see becoming a poet?”, with your uploaded contacts on the app as answer choices.

The app has racked up over 1 billion poll answers since officially launching in limited states in August, mostly from teens and high…

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Google Photos gets more pet-friendly


If you’re a pet owner who uses Google Photos, you’ve probably typed in “dog” or “cat” before in order to surface photos of your furry pal – like anytime someone asks you about your pet, for example, which clearly means they would like to see a picture of Mr. Fluffypants. Today, Google is introducing an easier way to aggregate your pet photos in its Photos app – by allowing you to group all your pet’s photos in one place, right beside the people Google Photos organized using facial recognition.

This is an improvement over typing in “dog,” or another generalized term, because the app will now only group together photos of an individual pet together, instead of returning all photos you’ve captured with a “dog” in them.

And like the face grouping feature, you…

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Spanish bank BBVA launches money transfer app Tuyyo, initially focused on U.S.-Mexico remittances


BBVA, Spain’s second-largest bank that snatched up mobile banking startup Simple for $117 million back in 2014, is now entering the mobile money transfer business with today’s launch of a new app called Tuyyo. The app, which is available on both iOS and Android, is focused on the $73 billion annual market for remittances to Latin America and the Caribbean from the U.S.

However, the service is initially launching with money transfers from the U.S. to Mexico, where the average amount sent by U.S. workers is about $1,900 per year, says BBVA. It also notes that the U.S. to Mexico corridor sees over $27 billion flowing between the countries annually, making it one of the world’s largest.

Tuyyo (whose name spelled out as “tu y yo” would mean “you and I” in English), will…

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We Heart It says a data breach affected over 8 million accounts, included emails and passwords


We Heart It, an image-sharing site used by 40 million teens as of a couple of years ago, is informing users their personal data may have been compromised. The company was alerted to a possible security breach last week that involved over 8 million accounts, it said on Friday. The breach took place a few years ago and includes email addresses, usernames and encrypted passwords for We Heart It accounts created between 2008 and November 2013.

Although the passwords were encrypted, they are not secure, the company notes.

“…the encryption algorithms commonly used to encrypt passwords in 2013 are no longer secure due to advancements in computer hardware,” reads a We Heart It blog post detailing their findings.

The company adds that, since that time, it has made improvements to its…

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Mobile phone companies appear to be providing your number and location to anyone who pays


You may remember that last year, Verizon (which owns Oath, which owns TechCrunch) was punished by the FCC for injecting information into its subscribers’ traffic that allowed them to be tracked without their consent. That practice appears to be alive and well despite being disallowed in a ruling last March: companies appear to be able to request your number, location, and other details from your mobile provider quite easily.

The possibility was discovered by Philip Neustrom, co-founder of Shotwell Labs, who documented it in a blog post earlier this week. He found a pair of websites which, if visited from a mobile data connection, report back in no time with numerous details: full name, billing zip code, current location (as inferred from cell tower data), and more. (Others found…

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Fandango is acquiring rival online ticketer MovieTickets.com


A consolidation in the advance movie ticketing space is happening today, with Fandango’s announcement that it’s acquiring rival MovieTickets.com for an undisclosed sum. The deal, which is expected to close before year-end, will help Fandango expand its international footprint, particularly in Latin America, as well as bring new cinemas to its ticketing platform.

Headquartered in Boca Raton, Florida, MovieTickets.com today serves moviegoers in the U.S., Canada, the U.K. and Latin America. That means in addition to helping Fandango gain more ground in Latin America – particularly in popular moviegoing countries Argentina and Mexico, Fandango says – the acquisition will allow Fandango to establish a presence in both Canada and the U.K. for the first time.

The deal follows other…

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PartyWith’s new app is part event-finder, part friend-finder


Having just returned from an overseas vacation where I “partied with” a number of locals met spontaneously while out at concerts, bars and other events, I can’t quite wrap my head around the need for a dedicated app for travelers wanting to meet locals to hang out with — doesn’t this just happen naturally? But that, at least in part, is the premise behind today’s official launch of PartyWith, a revamped version of the app previously known as Party with a Local.

Founder Dan Fennessy notes the app has outgrown being only for travelers, but poking around in the app, that seems to still be a top use-case.

To be fair, PartyWith isn’t exactly carving out new territory in online networking — it’s part of a growing trend. (And perhaps I’m just showing my age when…

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iOS and Samsung market share now tied in the U.S.


iOS and Samsung’s U.S. market share is now tied, following growth for Apple’s smartphone OS over the three months ending in August, based on new data from Kantar Wordpanel, which tracks smartphone market share by way of sales data. According to its analysis, iOS is up 3.7 percentage points year-over-year, to achieve 35 percent market share, while Samsung only grew 0.8 points, reaching a 35.2 percent share.

Kantar says that weaker sales through Verizon hurt Samsung, while Apple reached nearly a 50 percent with that carrier – the U.S.’s largest. That’s higher than its share with AT&T, the firm pointed out, which has been a traditional stronghold for the iPhone.

The increased iPhone sales in the U.S. also came one month before the release of the iPhone 8 and 8 Plus –…

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